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About this site

Unlike most historical studies of the period, this website focuses on the history of ‘places’, that supported people or events.  With current mapping technology, we are able to take historical information and combine it with geographical data, thus providing a single ‘point of truth’ for each place. All related material will return focus to that particular point.

Offering increased relevance and context to Queensland’s WWII places required a multi-level approach. This website combined history, imagery and cartography and bundled all the aspects into a digital space. All the aspects relate and refer back to the icons on the maps, which provide a portal to greater understanding.

Much of the initial research and writing of historical citations was undertaken by the following professional historians:

  • Brian Rough, Heritage Unit, Brisbane City Council
  • Jack Ford, Heritage Unit, Brisbane City Council
  • Brian Sinclair, Department of Environment and Resource Management
  • Howard Pearce, Heritage Consultant, Brisbane
  • Ray Holyoak, Holyoak Research, Townsville.

The Department of Public Works managed the project and developed the website and associated content management system. Additional records and information were readily provided by the Cultural Heritage Branch of the Department of Environment and Resource Management, the Heritage Unit of the Brisbane City Council, the National Archives of Australia and the MacArthur Museum Brisbane.

Images and multimedia were sourced through the State Library of Queensland, the Australian War Memorial, the National Archives of Australia and other archives and private collections.

During the development of the website, it became evident that Queensland held a vast number of WWII places, many of which had yet to be recognised. This website will continue to be developed as more information becomes available and act as an information portal. It is hoped that this website becomes a valuable resource that will be greatly appreciated by historians and students, as well as being of continuing interest to the general public.

Last updated
30 June 2014